Mar 142011
 

Great post by Seth Godin on so-called dead media.  In fact it is so great I am reposting it in full:

Bring me stuff that’s dead, please
RSS is dead. Blogs are dead. The web is dead.
Good.
Dead means that they are no longer interesting to the drive-by technorati. Dead means that the curiousity factor has been satisfied, that people have gotten the joke.
These people rarely do anything of much value, though.
Great music wasn’t created by the first people to grab an electric guitar or a synthesizer. Great snowboarding moves didn’t come from the guy who invented the snowboard… No one thinks Gutenberg was a great author, and some of the best books will be written long after books are truly dead.
Only when an innovation is dead can the real work begin. That’s when people who are seeking leverage get to work, when we can focus on what we’re saying, not how (or where) we’re saying it.
The drive-by technorati are well-informed, curious and always probing. They’re also hiding… hiding from the real work of creating work that matters, connections with impact and art that lasts. I love to hear about the next big thing, but I’m far more interested in what you’re doing with the old big thing.

Only when a technology settles into the swamp of daily culture and starts composting, only then can interesting things start happening with it.

Mar 102011
 

This awesome infographic (courtesy of Mahendra Palsule from Techmeme and Skeptic Geek) – illustrates perfectly how a business based on exploiting the long tail in its field will always beat older (and more established) business practices.  A mere 11 years ago Blockbuster had the chance to buy Netflix for peanuts, but instead it completely ignored what Netflix and its ilk portend, probably believing (commonsense) that a brand name and a global distribution chain are an unassailable bastion. A defining mistake. What Netflix did to Blockbuster, Amazon did to Borders and a myriad of smaller booksellers.  The cloud is winning.